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Jumping Spiders (Salticidae)

The jumping spider family (Salticidae) contains over 600 described genera and more than 5800 described species, making it the largest family of spiders with about 13% of all species. Jumping spiders have some of the best vision among arthropods and use it in courtship, hunting, and navigation.

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Crab Spiders (Thomisidae)

The Thomisidae are a family of spiders, including about 175 genera and over 2,100 species. The common name crab spider is often applied to species in this family, but is also applied loosely to many other species of spiders. Among the Thomisidae, “crab spider” refers most often to the familiar species of “flower crab spiders“, though not all members of the family are limited to ambush hunting in flowers. (credit wikipedia)

 

Huntsman Spider (Sparassidae)

Huntsman spiders, members of the family Sparassidae (formerly Heteropodidae), are known by this name because of their speed and mode of hunting. They also are called giant crab spiders because of their size and appearance. Larger species sometimes are referred to as wood spiders, because of their preference for woody places (forests, mine shafts, woodpiles, wooden shacks). In southern Africa the genus Palystes are known as rain spiders or lizard-eating spiders. Commonly they are confused with baboon spiders from the Mygalomorphae infraorder, which are not closely related.

More than a thousand Sparassidae species occur in most warm temperate to tropical regions of the world, including much of Australasia, Africa, Asia, the Mediterranean Basin, and the Americas. (credit wikipedia)

Wolf Spider (Lycosidae)

Wolf spiders are members of the family Lycosidae, from the Ancient Greek word “λύκος” meaning “wolf”. They are robust and agile hunters with excellent eyesight. They live mostly in solitude and hunt alone, and do not spin webs. Some are opportunistic hunters pouncing upon prey as they find it or even chasing it over short distances. Some will wait for passing prey in or near the mouth of a burrow.

Wolf spiders resemble nursery web spiders (family Pisauridae), but wolf spiders carry their egg sacs by attaching them to their spinnerets. (Pisauridae carry their egg sacs with their chelicerae and pedipalps). Two of the wolf spider’s eight eyes are large and prominent, which distinguishes them from the nursery web spiders whose eyes are all of approximately equal size. This can also help distinguish them from grass spiders. (credit wikipedia)

Jumping Spiders (Salticidae)

The jumping spider family (Salticidae) contains over 600 described genera and more than 5800 described species, making it the largest family of spiders with about 13% of all species. Jumping spiders have some of the best vision among arthropods and use it in courtship, hunting, and navigation.

Although they normally move unobtrusively and fairly slowly, most species are capable of very agile jumps, notably when hunting, but sometimes in response to sudden threats or crossing long gaps. Both their book lungs and tracheal system are well-developed, and they use both systems (bimodal breathing). Jumping spiders are generally recognized by their eye pattern. All jumping spiders have four pairs of eyes, with the anterior median pair being particularly large. (credit wikipedia)

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